14 Spaniel Dog Breeds for Canine Lover

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American Cocker Spaniel The American cocker spaniel is one of the most beloved spaniels.   

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American Water Spaniel This rare, medium-sized breed originated in the Great Lakes region of the United States. 

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Boykin Spaniel This rare breed is medium in size and was bred in the Great Lakes region of the United States. 

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Cavalier King Charles Spaniel The Cavalier King Charles, although only officially recognized by AKC in 1995, is still a noble breed. 

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Clumber Spaniel One of our largest spaniels is the Clumber. He is more calm than many of his working cousins. 

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English Cocker Spaniel This breed's name likely comes from spaniels being friendly, agile, and compact. English cockers are a popular companion breed. 

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English Springer Spaniel The English springer is another famous spaniel. These spaniels are energetic and active and would not be at home in a sedentary environment. 

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Papillon Surprised to learn that the papillon is a spaniel. These ears were once quite swollen. 

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Welsh Springer Spaniel Although smaller than its English counterparts, the Welsh springer spaniel is very similar to its English counterpart. 

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English Toy Spaniel The English spaniel, is known for its cuddly personality and cheerful disposition. 

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Field Spaniel The field spaniels were closely related with springer spaniels, cocker spaniels, and cocker spaniels. 

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Irish Water Spaniel An average-sized gun dog, the Irish water spaniel (also known as the rattail spaniel due to its smooth tail), is the 

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Kooikerhondje (Kooiker) A Dutch Kooikerhondje, a small spaniel with friendly temperament, is 

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Sussex Spaniel The Sussex spaniel is more rare than its cousins. This breed was created in the latter 18th and early nineteenth centuries. 

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