Chickens can identify more than 100 faces of their species. Their memories are as good as those of elephants. 

Chickens can identify more than 100 faces of their species. Their memories are as good as those of elephants. 

They share what they see with each other. Chickens use more than 24 vocalisations to communicate with one another. They can warn friends of predators or let mothers know if they are okay. 

Chickens have pain receptors that enable them to feel pain and distress. Imagine how they feel when they have to endure horrific mutilations such as being cut with an infra-red laser. This happens without the use of painkillers. 

Hens guard their young from predators. 

Chickens love to jump and run, so billions of them have sheds with less space than an A4 sheet. 

Chickens can have dreams, just like us. In their sleep, they may experience rapid eye movement (REM). This could be a sign that their minds are drifting from factory farms where they are kept. 

They eat grass like spaghetti. That's right! 

Wild chickens lay between 10 and 15 eggs each year during their breeding season. Many hens raised in the egg industry to produce eggs every day often suffer from painful reproductive disorders and exhaustion. 

Research has shown that chickens are more intelligent than toddlers. The ability to demonstrate self control, mathematical reasoning and structural engineering is all displayed by chickens. 

Chickens know who's boss. Chickens, like us, form social structures called "pecking order", which help them identify their place on the ladder. When they are packed into intensive farm with thousands to hundreds of birds, their social hierarchy crumbles. This is where feather-pecking and cannibalism, as well as stress, begin. 

Chickens' origins come from tropical rainforests, where they evolved over many millions of years. Chickens may feel vulnerable if they are raised in artificial farm pastures. 

Chickens' origins come from tropical rainforests, where they evolved over many millions of years. Chickens may feel vulnerable if they are raised in artificial farm pastures. 

Research has shown that 90% of predator attacks can be survived by chickens if they are living in their natural environment. 

T.rex is the closest living relative to chickens. The T.rex is close living relatives, although not as scary! 

Roosters perform a dance called "tidbitting" to attract hens. It involves moving their heads up and down, as well as making a particular type of call. It is believed that large wattles attract female hens. 

Chickens are able to recognize object permanence. This means that objects can be hidden and still remain. Children younger than 5 years old cannot use this ability. 

Mother hens talk to their unborn babies and they chirp in their shells. Factory-farmed chicks are not allowed to see their parents because they are taken away as soon as they are laid. 

They can use the sun for navigation, which allows them find food and water as they know when it is. Many chickens raised to eat eggs and meat will not be able to see the sun through their dark sheds. 

Chickens love to have dust baths. They can get very upset at factory farms when they can't clean up after themselves. A great way to prevent parasites and keep your feathers insulated is to take a bath.